IMPORTANT FACTS TO KNOW ABOUT INFOGRAPHICS FOR KIDS: VISUAL LEARNING STRATEGIES

According to the Academy of Educational Leadership, the application of visual learning tools, such as infographics, has increased by 9,000 percent since 2009. They also indicate that visual learning is preferred by about 65% of learners, and that "visuals are processed 60,000 times faster in the brain than text. As we all know in this technological age, information is visually communicated through social media, photography, films, newspapers, magazines, textbooks, and marketing. Even SAT college admission tests are using more graphic type questions.

Having been a teacher and an artist, I love combining art visuals and learning. More importantly, as an artsy kid, I would have greatly benefited from information and ideas presented graphically. So, just as we teach reading strategies and language literacy, it is now just as important to teach visual literacy.



HOW TO START:

  • First, kids need to understand the purpose of infographics. IT IS AN ORGANIZING TOOL USED TO PRESENT A COMPLEX SUBJECT OR INFORMATION IN GRAPHIC FORM DESIGNED TO QUICKLY GRAB THE READERS ATTENTION AND INTEREST.

  • Next, kids need to understand the different forms. Here are a few examples. Make sure to visit my RESOURCE LIBRARY FOR SOME PRINTABLE EXAMPLES TO USE IN THE CLASSROOM!

#1. Statistical

#2. Informational

#3. Timeline

#4. Process (steps)

#5. Geographic

#6. Comparison and contrast

#7. Hierarchical (from highest to least)

#8. List


  • Next, kids need to understand visual information practices. A great way to do this is to brainstorm with the kids. Using an example, ask:

#1. Does it have a clear message and stay on topic?

#2. What strikes you at first glance?

#3. What colors are used?

#4. Are there helpful visuals?

#5. Is it a quick read or cluttered?

#6. How does it make your eyes move?

#7. How do they use numbers, labels, or statistics?

  • Finally, it is also important for kids to be able to interpret and understand the purpose of specific graphs and data. Here are a few examples for early elementary.

#1. Bar Graph: Quickly makes comparisons.

#2. Picture Graph: Makes comparisons using pictures or symbols.

#3. Circle Graph: Shows percentages of a whole.

#4. Line Graph: Indicates changes over time.

I found this great site with many tips for data and graphing at TEACHING WITH A MOUNTAIN VIEW.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE: How to make a infographic timeline. OR Five steps to make informational infographics.


TO HELP YOU INTRODUCE INFOGRAPHIC CONCEPTS, I HAVE DESIGNED SEVERAL PRINTABLES JUST FOR YOU! Debbieseftonart.com monthly newsletter subscribers will have exclusive access to all of my printables. Once you subscribe, you will receive the PASSWORD TO MY RESOURCE LIBRARY IN YOUR EMAIL WELCOME LETTER.




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